2017-01-14 Sat

Clear Thinking

On Wednesday, January 11, 2017 the Globe And Mail published an article titled ď Toronto to add red-light cameras, revamp risky intersections for seniors Ē This is part of the city-wide knee-jerk reaction to pedestrian deaths.

As usual, Toronto gathers statistics, and then uses them to drive a solution to a problem that differs from the original problem.

Hereís the original problem: Pedestrians are being killed by motorists.

Hereís the original problem stated more fully: Pedestrians of all ages are being killed by motorists of all types at all hours of the day and night on every weekday right across the City of Toronto (think ďSouth Of SteelesĒ)

The statistical studies brings to our attention that seniors, of all ages, night time, of all times, and at these intersections, of all the intersections.

Toronto City, in its infinite wisdom, decides to do something about these intersections.

Why?

Because that will improve the reported statistics.

The problem isnít statistics.

The problem is that drivers and pedestrians are competing for space.

As distinct from France, where drivers and pedestrians see it as an heaven-sent opportunity to work together.

Red-lights donít prevent deaths. The photons are far too weak to reduce the velocity of a vehicle to zero.

Letís be honest: Massive and instant and no-question fines, instant impounding of the vehicle and so on do not deter or prevent idiots from exceeding the speed limit by 50 Km/hour.

Likewise, nothing but a change in driver attitude will reduce pedestrian deaths to zero, which is the only statistic worth worshipping.

A change in Driver Attitude will come about in many ways, but it will have to come about for pedestrians of all ages, at all times of day, and at every intersections in the City of Toronto.

Mid-block, too.

A change in Pedestrian Attitude will come about in many ways, but it will have to come about for pedestrians of all ages, at all times of day, and at every intersections in the City of Toronto.

Mid-block, too.

If anything should be installed, it should be intersection fences at every intersection, with the pedestrian crossing thirty feet back from the intersection, where drivers are eyes-forward, not peering to the left for a gap in the traffic.